Why doesn’t Chick-fil-A support ‘Made in USA’?

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Right off the bat, I will say that I love Chick-fil-A. I like their food and efforts to support the local communities in which they operate.

So imagine my disbelief when I discovered that the new, promotional Chick-fil-A T-shirts offered at the restaurant in my area are made in Nicaragua. How does that support my local community or other communities where Chick-fil-A operates?

The company website states the following: “Being a Chick-fil-A Operator is about more than serving chicken, it’s about having a positive impact in the local community. That’s why, around the country, our restaurant Operators find creative ways to serve. In some communities, that means supporting the troops through military appreciation events or fundraisers for local schools; in others, that means inviting guests for family events like Daddy Daughter Date Night or Stuffed Animal Sleepover. Our Operators are always on the lookout for ways to help their communities.”

How many workers in Nicaragua, who receive money for making these T-shirts, will walk into a Chick-fil-A restaurant to buy a chicken sandwich? It seems to be a rather short-sighted business decision.

And the best way to support the troops and funding for public schools is to Buy American, since American workers are the only ones that pay taxes for the U.S. military, national defense, education, etc. Workers in Nicaragua don’t pay a dime in taxes to America for these worthy causes.

Check out the best of Roger Simmermaker, in “How Americans Can Buy American” and “My Company ‘Tis of Thee” in the WND Superstore.

If American workers were employed to make Chick-fil-A’s T-shirts, they would have the money through their wages to patronize Chick-fil-A, and I’m sure they would be happy and motivated to do so.

Another statement on Chick-fil-A’s website goes like this: “Everyone’s job at Chick-fil-A is to serve. No matter our title or job description, our reason for coming to work is to generously share our time and talents. Whether it’s treating customers like friends, or serving our communities (emphasis added by me) like neighbors, we believe kindness is a higher calling.”

Exactly how does paying workers in Nicaragua, who pay no taxes to America, to make T-shirts pursue “serving our communities”?

Another part of the Chick-fil-A website reads: “We should be about more than just selling chicken. We should be a part of our customers’ lives and the communities in which we serve.”

How do we serve our local American communities and be a part of the lives of Americans by sending money to Nicaragua to make T-shirts? There are several companies that make T-shirts in America that would be grateful to have the work to earn wages to spend at a Chick-fil-A restaurant, especially if that company (Chick-fil-A) was partially responsible for helping to keep them in business.

After all, Americans can only be as affluent as consumers as they are wage earners.

Unfortunately, there is not a specific email address to which you can send a message to Chick-fil-A. And the particular shirt I am referring to, as far as I know, is only available at one location near where I live in Orlando, Florida. But I’m sure there are other T-shirt promotions at other Chick-fil-A restaurants. A simple Google search will show that there are several different types of Chick-fil-A shirts in circulation. And the odds that all of these other T-shirts being offered are all made in the USA is pretty remote, so we can still send a company-wide message to the owners of Chick-fil-A restaurants (a privately-held U.S. company).

Click here for the link where you can send your comments (after listing your name, address, etc.).

Here is a sample of a comment you can paste into the feedback portion of the web-based contact form:

“Stop making your promotional shirts in Nicaragua! Make them in America to give American workers money to spend at your restaurants! Workers in Nicaragua can’t spend their wages at Chick-fil-A. Your stated values of supporting local communities are not consistent with making T-shirts in Nicaragua.”

Or, of course, you can write your own comments!

The main thing is that we make a statement in favor of employing American workers, which will keep jobs, profits, and tax revenue within our national borders.

Check out the best of Roger Simmermaker, in “How Americans Can Buy American” and “My Company ‘Tis of Thee” in the WND Superstore.

from Propaganda Guard https://propguard.tumblr.com/post/162884574443
from Tumblr http://lisahcnease.tumblr.com/post/162884659157

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